Annie’s Antarctica Expedition Update #5

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Expedition update #5

March 4th – evening -ish.

Every evening after dinner, we have presentations from different people of the expedition. This has been one of my favourite parts. One of the most informative has been from David Hone – a lead climate change advisor at Shell. I have been learning so much about the implications of the Paris agreement and possible scenario solutions to allow us to reach the target of a global temperature of less than 2 degrees.  The research suggests that we are NOT on target to achieve this and are actually a long way off!  Changes need to happen quicker, we need to do more. Can you find me below? Hint: I’m not too far off centre!

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This group of 92 are full of people who in their own way are doing something in their communities to help fight climate change.  Here is one example:

 

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Vijay Varada from Bangalore: Researched and built a wind turbine using a 3d printer.  He tested it out on the shores of Petermann island and enough energy was produced to charge his mobile phone! He will make the plans open source meaning that they are free to anyone in the world.

 March 5th – morning

I am starting to get very tired and have only limited time to spend in Antarctica so my blog posts will be short from now on.  A big theme of this expedition is to DISCONNECT to RECONNECT.  It has been so refreshing not to have to check my email and WhatsApp and messenger every 10 seconds.  It really has had an impact on me to try to be less reliant on our hand held friends and to be more aware of the present moment.  Recent articles have suggested that social media is making us lonely – I think I agree with that.  Putting my phone down is going to be a big takeaway for me from this time spent in nature.

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Morning Zodiac cruise Berthelot Islands. A group of rocky islands lying west off the Palmer Peninsula . The islands were discovered by the French Antarctic expedition of 1903 – 1905, under Charcot. The islands were named for Marcelin Berthelot, a prominent French chemist and benefactor of the expedition.

Fun fact: French explorer Jean-Baptiste Charcot carved the initials of his ship (P.P) into a rock in the bay of Petermann Island – Do you know what the name of his ship was? Click here for answer.

 We cruised around and sat quietly listening to the sounds of Antarctica.  ICEBERGS, CRAZY/BEAUTIFUL SHAPES, SPIKEY, SMOOTH, EERIE, SPOOKY, ANOTHER PLANET, MYSTICAL, DEEP BLUE, CONTRAST OF MOUNTAIN AND ICE, GLACIERS, BERGY BITS, BRASH, CRACKS, POPPING, FOG, 10,000 YEAR OLD ICE!

 March 5th – afternoon

Petermann Island lies just below the Lemaire channel, southwest of Hovgaard Island in the Wilhelm Archipelago.  It was discovered by the Dallman expedition of 1873 – 74 and named after August Petermann, a German Geographer and supporter of Polar exploration.  It is home to Adelie penguins (around 500 breeding pairs) and the most Southern colony of gentoo penguins in Antarctica (2000 breeding pairs)

Penguins – CUTE CUTE CUTE, MADE ME LAUGH, WADDLE, WINGS BACK, CHASING EACH OTHER, SQUAWKING, SLEEPING, SWIMMING, JUMPING, SLIDING, FALLING OVER, PECKING, CURIOUS, INQUISITVE, AWKWARD.  

We saw an adult penguin feeding its young.  The young pecks at the beak of the adult which then produces a gag reflex and the adult brings up the food for the young penguin to eat!

The most notable thing about how a penguin moves is how agile and sleek it is in the water and how awkward it is on land!  

In the zodiac on the way back to the ship, we saw a Leopard seal!  It was the first sighting of the expedition.  It popped its head up to have a look at us.   They are quite curious and had a noticeably massive head.  It was hunting for penguins.  As they are not as agile as penguins in the water, they have to hide and take the penguins by surprise.

Don’t forget to check out the 2041 blog where you will find additional updates and photos!

Thank you for following,

Annie

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